Anne Bailey

Binghamton University Professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York
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Anne Bailey, Binghamton University Professor of History and Director of the Harriet Tubman Center for the Study of Freedom and Equity, is available to discuss a variety of issues in relation to recent protests and race in America.

Expanding curriculum on structural and systemic racism in high schools

How the issue of slavery reparations need to be addressed in order to heal racial divisions 

The constant fear that Black mothers have that their sons will be killed

The role of the church now and in civil rights history 

History of protests in the civil rights movement

Bailey, a contributor to The New York Times’s 1619 Project, research interests include African-American history; African and African Diaspora studies; history and memory; oral history; and civil rights. She writes and speaks about a variety of topics related to these research areas, including race, slavery, immigration, refugees, diasporas, faith and history and human rights.
In her work, Bailey combines the elements of travel, adventure, history and an understanding of contemporary issues with an accessible style. Her works range from adult non-fiction to children’s historical fiction, and includes African Voices of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Beyond the Silence and the Shame (Beacon Press, 2005) and You Can Make A Difference: The Story of Martin Luther King Jr. (Bantam/Doubleday/Dell). Her newest book, The Weeping Time: Memory and the Largest Slave Auction in American History, was published by Cambridge University Press in October 2017 and has received very wide coverage.

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  • The issue of slavery reparations needs to be addressed in order to heal racial divisions today, according to Anne C. Bailey, professor of history at Binghamton University, State University of New York, civil rights scholar and contributor to the prize-winning New York Times 1619 Project.

    “Many of us have kept our views to ourselves and have not dared to say what we think and feel. Around the dining room table or with our intimate friends, we may say a word, but otherwise, we are silent,” says Bailey. “The question is: Has this silence helped to heal our racial divisions? And is this silence and subsequent inaction at the root of our current crisis today?”

    Bailey has made the case for reparations in African Voices of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Beyond the Silence and the Shame which was originally published in 2005 (Beacon Press) and also in her most recent book, The Weeping Time: Memory and the Largest Slave Auction in American History. (Cambridge University Press, 2017).

    Binghamton University offers live or pre-taped interviews powered by a state-of-the-art ReadyCam television studio system, available at a moment’s notice. Our system can broadcast live HD audio and video to networks, news agencies, and affiliates interviewing Binghamton faculty, students, and staff. Video is transmitted by VideoLink and fees may apply.

    22 December 2020
  • “Tearing down Confederate statues is not about erasing history,” Professor Bailey said. “Their very presence erases the history of the victory of the North over the South.” Via The New York TImes

    22 December 2020
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  • Binghamton University, State University of New York
    Binghamton University Professor